Make your own free website on Tripod.com
RECIPE SOURCE
Front Page | Recipe Source for Cajun, Creole and Louisiana Recipes id 1 | BBQ, Beef, Chicken, Pork, Seafood and Charts | Texas, Tex - Mex and Mexican Recipes and More | All Recipes Free On-line Dictionary 8 | new | new | new | new | new | New | Submit A Recipe Sign Visitors Book | Taco Salad by Sharon Stacy | new 40
Cajun Roux and Recipes

We get alot of requests for gumbo recipes here at Recipe Source. To help you get the most out of my recipes, we put together these recipes for Roux to help you get started.

Gumbo is a traditional stew served in Louisiana. There is no set formula for gumbo.
Gumbo is a traditional stew served in Louisiana . There is no set formula for gumbo. Even though it derives its name from the African word for okra, gumbos don't always contain okra.

Gumbo usually consists of one or more meats such as chicken, duck, sausage, or ham. Seafood gumbos can be fish or shellfish, or a mixture of the two.  There are also gumbos that combine meat and seafood.

As for vegetables, gumbo always contains the Trinity of Cajun cooking- bell pepper, onions, and celery. Beyond those staples, you may find okra, tomatoes, or mirlitons, a gourd-like fruit.

The first step with all gumbos is making a roux (pronounced roo) . This is done by cooking flour in oil or butter until it turns nut-brown or darker. The roux  provides flavour, colour and thickening for the gumbo. ( See Roux Recipes Below )

Roux Facts
It was during the middle of the 17th century that roux was introduced as a thickener and binder. In classic French cuisine, roux is a mixture of equal amounts (by weight) of flour and butter, cooked for a short time, both to rid the mixture of a 'raw' flour taste and to obtain the desired color. Cooking the flour with oil or fat also coats the starch and prevents it from forming lumps when added to a liquid. In French cuisine, roux is white, blonde or brown, depending upon the sauce it is to be used in. White roux is cooked just long enough to get rid of the raw taste (used for veloute, béchamel, etc.); blonde roux is cooked to a pale golden color; brown roux is cooked until a light brown color is obtained (used in demi-glace, Espagnole, etc.). Its purpose is to thicken.

Creole roux is basically the same, sometimes using bacon fat or lard in place of butter. Creole brown roux is cooked more than the French brown roux. It is used as a thickener, but because it is cooked longer, does add some flavor. Its color begins where French roux ends.

It is with Cajun cooking that roux really comes into its own. Cajun brown roux is made with lard, vegetable oils, bacon fat and even duck fat. Cajun roux can be from light brown to a very deep, dark, nutty brown. Roux is used in Cajun cuisine for flavor rather than for thickening. When the roux is cooked to a dark brown, it loses much of its thickening power, but gains a rich, deep nutty flavor. This dark brown, nutty roux is the basis for many classic Cajun dishes, adding a unique richness and depth. It is the secret ingredient in Cajun food.

The Brown Roux:
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup flour

In a heavy bottom sauté pan, melt butter over medium high heat. Using a wooden roux spoon,
add flour, stirring constantly until flour becomes light brown. You must continue stirring during
the cooking process, as flour will tend to scorch as browning process proceeds. Should black
specks appear in the roux, discard and begin again. This volume of roux will thicken three cups
of stock to sauce consistency.

The Blonde Butter Roux:
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup flour

In a heavy bottom sauté pan, melt butter over medium high heat. Proceed exactly as in the
brown roux recipe, however, only cook to the pale gold state. This roux is popular in Creole
cooking and will thicken three cups of stock to a sauce consistency.

The White Butter Roux:
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup flour

In a heavy bottom sauté pan, melt butter over medium high heat. Proceed exactly as in the
blonde roux recipe, however, only cook until the flour and butter are well blended and bubbly.
Do not brown. This classical style roux is popular in Creole cooking and will thicken three cups
of stock to a sauce consistency.

The Light Brown Cajun Roux:

1/2 cup oil
1/2 cup flour

In a black iron pot or skillet, heat the oil over medium high heat to approximately 300 degrees F.
Using a wooden roux spoon, slowly add the flour, stirring constantly until the roux is peanut
butter in color, approximately two minutes. This roux is normally used to thicken vegetable
dishes such as corn maque choux (shrimp, corn and tomato stew) or butter beans with ham. If
using this roux to thicken an etouffee, it will thicken approximately two quarts of liquid. If used
to thicken seafood gumbo, it will thicken approximately two and a half quarts of stock.

The Dark Brown Cajun Roux:

This roux gives food such a rich character that we sometimes make shrimp and corn bisque
with it, as well as a river road seafood gumbo that will knock your socks off. Slow cooking is
essential to achieve that dark, rich color.

1 cup oil
1/2 cup flour

Proceed as you would in the light brown Cajun roux recipe but continue cooking until the
roux is the color of a light caramel. This roux should almost be twice as dark as the light brown
roux but not as dark as chocolate. You should remember that the darker the roux gets, the less
thickening power it holds and the roux tends to become bitter. This roux is used most often in
sauce piquantes, crawfish bisques and gumbos. However, it is perfectly normal to use the dark
brown roux in any dish in Cajun cooking.

Your Basic Cajun Roux: Complete instructions for making a Light and Dark Cajun Roux.
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup oil for Light Brown Roux
OR
1 cup oil for Dark Brown Roux
 
The light Brown Cajun Roux:
In a black iron pot or skillet, heat the oil over medium high heat to approximately 300 degrees F. Using a wooden roux spoon, slowly add the flour, stirring constantly until the roux is peanut butter in color, approximately two minutes.
 
This roux is normally used to thicken vegetable dishes such as corn maque choux (shrimp, corn and tomato stew) or butter beans with ham.
If using this roux to thicken an etouffee, it will thicken approximately two quarts of liquid.
If used to thicken seafood gumbo, it will thicken approximately two and a half quarts of stock.
 
The Dark Brown Cajun Roux:
Proceed as you would in the light brown Cajun roux recipe but increase oil to 1 cup and continue cooking until the roux is the color of a light caramel. This roux should almost be twice as dark as the light brown roux but not as dark as chocolate.
You should remember that the darker the Roux gets, the less thickening power it holds and the Roux tends to become bitter.
 
This roux is used most often in sauce piquantes, crawfish bisques and gumbos.
It can be used  in any dish in Cajun cooking.
This roux gives food such a rich character that you can use it to make shrimp and corn bisque with it, as well as a river road seafood gumbo. Slow cooking is essential to achieve that dark, rich color.
 
Applications:
The Oil Base Roux (The Cajun Roux) with 1 cup vegetable oil and 1 cup flour cooked at 300 degrees F for three to five minutes will thicken the following:
 
6 cups stock to a thick brown sauce consistency.
8 cups stock to a thick gumbo consistency.
10 cups stock to a perfect Louisiana gumbo consistency.
12 cups stock to a light gumbo consistency.
The oil base roux's may be made well in advance, cooled, separated into half cup portions and placed in the refrigerator or freezer. The roux will keep well for months.

Site Design by L.D.B. C.W.U.
 © 2002 by All Recipes Recipe Source.

Corsicana, Texas. All Rights Reserved

--Contact Webmaster-- /-- Send a Recipe-- /